THE WRITING CONNECTION


Have you noticed that one of the first things kids want to learn is how to spell their name? Along with that request they usually want to learn how to read also.


Some children will have this desire at the age of 3. Other children may not express this desire until they are 5. A rich language environment is one factor that influences a child’s desire to learn.

So what does the writing connection have to do with reading?  Or what does reading have to do with writing?  Read on and it will all be tied together for you.



"READING IS THE NUTRITION FOR WRITING"
quote by Jack Gantos, author of Rotten Ralph



MOM, HOW DO I SPELL MY NAME?


As you can see from the quote above, you can't have good writing without a good connection to reading.  Just as our bodies need good nutrition in order to function properly, being able to read is just as important to the writing connection.


When teaching children how to spell their name, they must know the letters in their name and how to form that letter; and third, how to pronounce each sound the letter or the letter combination make.




A great way to teach your child's name to them is by using games and puzzles. Frecklebox has some wonderful puzzles that are personalized with your child's name. Most children love puzzles, especially floor puzzles. While you are helping your child put the puzzle together, you can be teaching her how to spell her name.


Protected by Copyscape Duplicate Content Detector


TYING IT TOGETHER


Writing is very important to reading as it ties the sounds of the letters to the letter symbols. It is essential that we teach these two things simultaneously. This is especially true for the kinetic learner.



Often times children learn the alphabet without learning to write the symbols. Learning the “Alphabet Song” is fine and fun. HOWEVER, this is the time he should also be learning how to spell his name not just singing the song.


It is important for the child to be able to recognize the symbol for the letter WITH the name of the letter. This is called the sound-symbol relationship. For instance, when he sees the letter “F” he says /ef/.


SO, what's the purpose of writing?


The purpose of writing is to be read by others or to be read by you. When we write for ourselves, it is usually notes to remind us of groceries to get, or errands to run. When we write for others, it is usually a letter, an essay or maybe even a book.




NEED GRAMMAR HELP?

Many times, children and adults don't like to write because they haven't mastered the process. Even people who have attended college and had to write essay papers may have a fear of writing.

Most everyone I know groans when they are asked to write a paper or an essay. My biggest fear is that I will make a grammar error and the person reading the paper won't take me serious.

Remember, that we each write from our experiences. Therefore, everyone will have a different writing style; the way they present the information for the reader. Some authors have a very straight forward, traditional way of presenting their information. Others, like Max Lucado, will present their topic in a very unconventional manner.


Yes, there are certain grammar rules that should govern our writing but that doesn't mean that it will be boring.


If you're not sure if a comma should be used before a but in a sentence, then find out.

We learn grammar rules best when we use them with our own writing.



On this grammar book website, you will find grammar rules, free grammar quizzes, help with professional writing and editing and english videos.  To order this book or to find help on the website click here:



See sight word activities or vocabulary activities for some games that will help develop this reading/writing connection early.





Leave Writing Connection;

Return to the SITE MAP





New! Comments

Let me hear from you about what you just read! Leave me a comment in the box below.
Share this page:
Enjoy this page? LINK TO IT! Here's how...

Would you prefer to share this page with others by linking to it?

  1. Click on the HTML link code below.
  2. Copy and paste it, adding a note of your own, into your blog, a Web page, forums, a blog comment, your Facebook account, or anywhere that someone would find this page valuable.